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The Contemporary Crisis in India and Sri Aurobindo’s warning

The tumultuous chaos and conflict that has now erupted all over India centering on the proposed National Population Register, Citizenship Amendment Act and National Register of Citizens seems to have crossed the line where contemporary political dispensations on either side of the fence can give readymade solutions. Rather it is Sri Aurobindo’s warning issued in his Independence Day Message on the eve of 15th August, 1947 that deserves attention where he comments apropos “a fissured and broken freedom”:

...the old communal division into Hindus and Muslims seems now to have hardened into a permanent political division of the country. It is to be hoped that this settled fact will not be accepted as settled for ever or as anything more than a temporary expedient. For if it lasts, India may be seriously weakened, even crippled: civil strife may remain always possible, possible even a new invasion and foreign conquest. India’s internal development and prosperity may be impeded, her position among the nations weakened, her destiny impaired or even frustrated”

No other visionary had given a more grim warning during that euphoria of independence.

What can we, admirers and followers of Sri Aurobindo, do at this juncture?

There will be no dearth of subjects who would actively and often impulsively participate in fiery movements. But there is also the need of a group of aspirants who could remain silent and detached and hold the consciousness that prevents disruption –the consciousness that forms the template on which the Divine Will could work.

The great psychologist, Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) showed with examples from the World Wars that times of crisis needed mature individuals with “psychic wholeness” to tide over and it was possible for a single such individual to turn the tide of a collective situation; echoing Sri Aurobindo famous declaration “One man’s perfection still can save the world”.

Date of Update: 27-Dec-19

 

 

 

 
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